Spay and Neuter Surgery

Spay Surgery

Ovariohysterectomy is the medical term for spaying a female dog, cat or rabbit. It is commonly called a “Spay” and consists of the surgical removal of both the ovaries and uterus. Both are removed because if the ovaries are not removed, the heat periods still will occur even though pregnancy is impossible. Though this surgery is routinely preformed, it is a major abdominal surgery requiring general anesthesia and sterile operating technique. The surgery usually is done between 6 and 9 months of age. Prevention of pregnancy and curtailing heat cycles is the main reason for Spaying, but the procedure is often necessary in treating severe uterine infections and ovarian and uterine tumors.

Some other benefits of spaying include decreased risk of Mammary Gland Cancer, when performed before going through heat cycle, decreased risk of uterine infection, no heat cycles and most importantly no unwanted kittens or puppies that are unable to find homes.

Common misconceptions of spaying are that it will make a pet fat, lazy, change the pet’s personality, or that the pet should be allowed to have at least one litter prior to surgery. Obesity is due to excessive calorie intake and should be controlled by proper diet and exercise. Because a pet’s personality does not fully develop until 1-2 years of age, surgery prior to this age is not likely to be a contributing factor, but life experiences can be the cause. There is no advantage in allowing your dog or cat to have a litter.

Spaying is a major surgery so your pet’s health will need to be evaluated before hand to ensure surgery is a safe as possible. Your pet should be free of intestinal parasites and current on all vaccinations. The doctors may recommend pre-surgical blood work to lessen the chance of complications. Your pet will need to be kept quiet until the stitches are removed, in about 14 days. Your pet will be sent home with pain medication to aid in recovery.

Neutering Dogs

Castration is the medical term for neutering a male dog. It is the surgical removal of the testicles. Such surgery is performed to eliminate sexual activities and render the dog sterile. Neutering usually, but not always, reduces the dog’s tendencies to roam and to fight. The general level of aggression may also be reduced. In older dogs it may be necessary due to diseases of the testicles or prostate gland.
Since neutering is still a surgery that requires general anesthesia your pet’s health will need to be evaluated before hand to ensure surgery is a safe as possible. Your pet should be free of intestinal parasites and current on all vaccinations. The doctors may recommend pre-surgical blood work to lessen the chance of complications. Your pet will need to be kept quiet until the stitches are removed, in about 12-14 days. Your pet will be sent home with pain medication to aid in recovery.

Neutering Cats

Castration is the medical term for neutering a male cat. It is the surgical removal of the testicles. When a cat is castrated just before sexual maturity, between 6 and 8 months of age, the cat’s sexual instincts are reduced and the cat becomes sterile. Sexually driven behavior, such as roaming, fighting, and urine marking or spraying, is either eliminated or markedly reduced. Neutering also reduces the strong urine odor associated with male cats. Your pet should be free of intestinal parasites and current on all vaccinations. Routine neutering does not involve sutures, but you will need to keep your pet quiet the day of and after surgery.