Vaccines

Preventative medicine is the best health care you can offer your pet. Having your pet vaccinated against contagious diseases to prevent illness may be one of the most important things you ever do for your pet. Vaccines help prevent diseases that are difficult and costly to treat. Some preventable diseases are life threatening and can not be treated at all. We encourage you to discuss with your veterinarian what is best for your individual pet, but here are some guidelines:

Puppies should begin a series of vaccinations at 6-8 weeks of age. They are vaccinated against Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parainfluenza, and Parvo Virus. The vaccine is given every 3-4 weeks to build up the proper immunity, until they are 16-18 weeks old. Their first Rabies vaccine is given between 4- 6 months of age.

Dogs should be vaccinated against Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parainfluenza, and Parvo Virus, and Rabies. Additional vaccines may be recommended because of lifestyle. The Bordetella vaccine, to prevent a disease known commonly as kennel cough, is required by most kennels. Owners whose pets who travel to areas with high incidents if Lymes Disease may chose to have their pet vaccinated against it.

Kittens should also start a series of vaccines around 6-8 weeks of age. They are vaccinated against Panleukopenia, Feline Viral Rhinotreacheitis and Calici. The vaccine is given every 3-4 weeks until they are 16 weeks old. Their first Rabies vaccine is given between 4- 6 months of age.
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Cats should be immunized for Panleukopenia, Feline Viral Rhinotreacheitis and Calici and Rabies. A vaccine against Feline Leukemia is available to help prevent infections of this deadly virus, responsible for a large percentage of feline mortality every year.

It should be noted that a Rabies vaccination for all pets is required in Cuyahoga County.
Occasionally your pet may experience some mild side effects, usually starting within hours of vaccination and typically lasting no longer than a few days. Side effects can include discomfort and swelling at the vaccination site, mild fever, decrease in appetite or activity, or sneezing or upper respiratory signs (if your pet had an intranasal vaccine). If your pet has been recently vaccinated, and he or she is experiencing any of these symptoms, please notify us.